Chawnghilh's Blog

Key and his triumphal Poem

Posted in Qualitus : Habitus by chawnghilh on October 2, 2009

Francis Scott Key is here

Francis Scott Key is here

 

Francis Scott Key shall never die in your heart after you go through my lines! How do you find American Flag —a beautiful eye-catching color rendition? Only that? More than that —let me tell you a very exciting story behind the American Flag floating every where in the American continent and elsewhere all over the Globe! Even on your T-shirts!

The flag is far more than the red, white, and blue cloth of which it is made. It is the symbol of America. It stands for the past and the present, and the future of America. It stands for the people, the land and the way of life.

When the Thirteen Original Colonies set out to become a free country close to 200 years ago, their men and women needed a rallying point, a flag.

“We will take the stars and blue union from heaven,” the great George Washington is reported to have said, “red from our mother country, separating it by white stripes, thus showing that we have separated from her (British Empire), and the white stripes shall go down to posterity representing liberty.”

During the Revolutionary War, men and women fought under that flag to gain their liberty. Since then, others have fought to keep that liberty. And whenever victory was theirs, they greeted their flag, their throats choked, and their eyes filled with tears of joy.

Possibly no one has better described this emotion than a young American lawyer who watched the bombardment of the American Fort McHenry outside of Baltimore, Maryland, by a British fleet on a September night in 1814. His heart was full of concern for his countrymen, and as morning had broken, he gazed toward the fort and wondered :

O say can you see, by the dawn’s eye early light, What so proudly we hailed at the twilight’s last gleaming, Whose broad stripes and bright stars through the perilous fight, O’er the ramparts we watched, were so gallantly streaming? And the rocket’s red glare, the bombs bursting in air, Gave proof through the night that our flag was still there, O say does that star-spangled banner yet wave O’er the land of the free and the home of the brave?

The bombardment ended at 8 am., September 14, 1814. As the smoke cleared, the young man saw that the flag was still flying over the fort. In his joy, he found expression for his hope for the future of his country:

O thus be it ever when freemen shall stand Between their loved homes and the war’s desolation! Blest with vict’ry and peace may the heaven rescued land Praise the Power that hath made and preserved us a nation! Then conquer we must, when our cause it is just, And this be our motto —’In God is our trust.’ And the star-spangled banner in triumph shall wave O’er the land of the free and the home of the brave.”

That day, the young man wrote down what he had felt, a friend had his poem printed, and shortly afterward his words were sung throughout the country. Francis Scott Key had written the song that became American national anthem.

Whenever you (a US citizen) hear it played or sung, stand up, salute if you are in uniform, or place your right hand over your heart if you are in civilian clothes—and think of your own future under that Star Spangled Banner.

Graves of the fallen comrades, shorter ones are original being substituted by taller ones, the Confederate Flag to commemorate their honors

Graves of the fallen comrades, shorter ones are original being substituted by taller ones, the Confederate Flag to commemorate their honors

What's on it? The Golden Key for the United States.

What's on it? The Golden Key for the United States.

Beautiful Key!

Beautiful Key!

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